• Download all required software
    • Before you can use the QuickStart Engine you will need to download the following
      • Visual Studio C# 2010 Express (the full version works as well, but is not free)
      • XNA 4.0
        • You will need to install Visual Studio prior to XNA. XNA add plugins to Visual Studio, which it could not do if Visual Studio wasn't already installed.
      • QuickStart Engine
        • You'll of course need to download the game engine itself, you can find the newest version of the QuickStart Engine by clicking the 'Downloads' tab at the top of this page.
        • You'll have the option to download either the source code and/or the sample game binary.
          • Downloading the source code will let you use the engine to make your own game(s). The source code also has the sample game project within it, so you can run the sample just by building it within Visual Studio.
          • Downloading the sample game binary will let you run the sample that shows some of what the engine can do.

             
  • Opening the solution
    • Open the QuickStart_Windows solution. (QuickStart_Windows.sln)
    • Please be aware the Xbox360 is not officially supported (as of v0.19). We do not have an Xbox developer on the project any longer. However, there is nothing in the engine that will prevent it from running on an XBox 360. If you would like to try I recommend opening your Settings.XML and setting 'GraphicsDetail' to 'low' or 'med'.
      • To create an Xbox 360 solution right click on 'QuickStart_Windows' and then 'Create Copy of Project for Xbox 360'.
      • You will likely run into compiling errors in this type of project, as it is untested, but the engine shouldn't need much to run on the 360.
      • If you want GUI you will need to download the 3rd-party GUI binaries from the Nuclex Framework site for the 360.
        • You will not be able to use the QuickStart Engine's enhanced GUI features on the 360 (double-clicking, minimizing/maximizing window, etc.), however that should not matter much as those are considered "Windows" and mouse features.

           
  • Building the project
    • Set starting project to the QuickStartSampleGame_Windows project: Right click on the project name in the Solution Explorer, and click ‘Set as Startup Project’.
      • If you want to run the engine on a DX9 graphics card, right click on the same project, go to 'Properties' -> 'XNA Game Studio' -> 'Game Profile' and then select 'Use Reach to access...'.
    • Change platform from 'Mixed Configurations' to 'x86'. This option is in a drop-down box in the toolbar at the top of your Visual Studio window.
    • Right click on each project in the solution, and then click build. If you haven’t made any changes to any project, then you should have no build errors. Or, alternatively, you may right click on the solution itself, and click Build.
      • PROGRAMMING TIP: In Visual Studio there is a tab near the top-middle of the screen that will usually say Debug or Release. If you build and run a project in Debug mode, you will be building a version that will let you break on breakpoints in your code, and receive detailed information about crashes you may have in a program. However, in Debug mode programs can sometimes run much slower. Usually you will want to run in Debug during testing, and then Release to see how everything performs. Also, to break on breakpoints you must be attached to the program itself. If you run using the F5 key, you will start out the program attached to it. If you use CTRL+F5 you will start unattached, and then must attach on your own later. This is done through the Build menu->Attach to process.
    • If you’ve successfully built the entire project, you can now run it. If you’ve successfully set the correct project, as listed a few steps above, then you can simply hit CTRL+F5.
  • You should be in a sample scene with a free roaming camera, a green sphere below the camera (which acts as a character), a stack of wooden crates in front of you, the top crate has a smoke particle emitter, a small space ship in the air, a translucent blue cube, and an invisible blue cube somewhere under the ship.

     
  • Controls for the demo
    • Debug controls
      • Press ‘C’ to show/hide physics volumes. (Be aware some complex shapes like the space ship will cause this mode to hurt performance quite a bit)
      • While physics volumes are visible, press ‘V’ to show/hide physics terrain vertices. (This is quite a performance hit, so only use it if necessary)
      • Press ‘O’ to show/hide terrain bounding boxes
    • Misc controls
      • Press F3 to toggle the mouse cursor on/off.
        • When the mouse cursor is active you can interact with GUI windows.
        • When the mouse cursor is on the free-camera will not respond to mouse movement.
      • Press Tab to attach the camera to an entity (or move to the next entity). If you attach to a character you gain control of that character.
      • Press F2 to detach from an entity and switch to free-cam mode.
      • Press backspace to delete all entities in the current scene (except for the root entity and the terrain).
      • Moving scroll wheel while attached to an entity will zoom in/out to/from that entity.
    • GUI controls
      • Double left-click on a window to minimize/restore it.
      • Left-click and hold on a window to drag the window
    • Character controls (keyboard and mouse)
      • Spacebar to jump.
      • W, A, S, D for linear movement
      • Hold left-mouse button and move mouse to rotate
    • Character controls (gamepad)
      • 'A' button to jump.
      • Left stick for movement.
      • Right stick for rotation.
    • Free-cam controls
      • Spacebar to fire a medium weight sphere, Left-Shift to fire a lightweight sphere, and Left-Alt to fire a heavy sphere.
        • Since the spheres are a different weight they physically react different from one another to the environment. The lighter the sphere to more it will float (or slower it will sink), and the heavier the sphere the more it can push other things around, for example, try firing different weight spheres at the wooden crates to see how they react. Even the crates have a specific density, and since they're wooden crates they will float in the water if you push them into it.
      • W, A, S, D to move the camera, or left thumbstick on the gamepad.
      • Move the mouse to move the camera.
      • Hold left mouse button to fly faster.
      • Move scroll wheel to zoom the camera in/out.

Last edited Jan 12, 2012 at 3:42 PM by LordIkon, version 12

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